Literacy in the general sense is the ability to be able to read (consume) and write (create). Media literacy builds on these two core elements of general literacy. Media literate individuals know how to

1) be wise consumers - to critically analyze media in all of its forms in a variety of contexts (social interactions, political discussions and campaigns, product advertising, etc.)

2) be deliberate message contributors - to use various media to share opinions and perspectives in constructive and creative ways.

Curricula

Grades:

4-12

“In this lesson plan students use BrainPOP resources (including the Make-A-Map concept mapping tool) to explore common advertising strategies and increase media literacy.” See other lesson options here.

Grades:

K-12

“[U]sing the CML MediaLit Kit™ as the foundation for organizing and teaching media literacy in the PK-12 classroom, creates a 21st century learning environment  in which students gain the communicating, problem-solving, and decision-making skills needed for living all of their lives in a global media culture. “The MediaLit Kit™ documents can be used individually or together, for training workshops, in-services, library reference and parent/community education as well as in the K-12 classroom.”

Grades: 

6-8

“Weekly [turnkey] lessons in digital citizenship, information literacy, and media literacy help students learn to use tech wisely and confidently. This program emphasizes critical thinking, ethical discussion and decision making about digital media issues... all through role-play, hands-on projects, and problem solving tasks.”

Grades: 

K-12

"Digital Respons-Ability is a local company with extensive experience working directly with school districts and parents. Our curriculum is flexible and adaptive to any school or audience."

Google and iKeepSafe: Become an Online Sleuth

Grades: 

6-8

“In this class [a 50-minute lesson plan], students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online. A Student Handout Booklet accompanies this class.”

Grades: 

4-8
This Media Literacy lesson is one of several that teach about different elements of digital citizenship. This lesson includes two videos and a lesson plan. “In this lesson students will have an opportunity to exercise and develop critical thinking relating to media, use problem solving skills to deconstruct media production, and collaborate to create a media communication piece.”

Grades: 

K-6
Designed to be used in an elementary school setting, but can be adapted for older children. “[K]ids see over 40,000 TV commercials every year [nevermind messages they get from other media]....Kids need to determine which messages are good for them, and know what to do when they’re not! Be a Media Detective! is a fun, empowering program for kids to learn crucial skills of media literacy. A good detective has to look at all the clues and T.H.I.N.K.!” Designed to be used by PTA during a White Ribbon Week, but can be incorporated into classroom teaching and discussions between parents and children at home.

Videos

Grades:

7-12

“In Their Own Words – High School Students Speak about Media Literacy”

Grades:

7-12

Creating critical thinkers through media literacy: Andrea Quijada at TEDxABQED. 7-minute video talks about deconstructing media and seeing submessages.

Grades:

7-12

“A collection of talks, lessons and other digital resources for 21st century learners.”

Interactive Games

“The Sports Network 2 is a self-directed literacy learning game that puts students in the role of managing director of a sports media company. During their “day at the office,” students will experience authentic workplace situations, including interacting with colleagues and reading various informational texts in the form of typical workplace communications. Students' main assignment focuses on preparing for an on-air interview, which allows them to review key concepts and best practices for research projects in real life. Reading comprehension skills are also assessed as students move toward the final interview.”

Grades: 

K-3

“Using a context of food marketing, this interactive game helps young children recognize the marketing techniques used on commercial websites that target children.”

Grades: 

7-8

Purpose is to help students identify propaganda.

Grades: 

3-6

“Webonauts Internet Academy is a web original game for PBS KIDS GO! that gives kids 8 to 10-year-old an opportunity to have some fun while exploring what it means to be a citizen in a web-infused‚ information-rich world. It is an engaging experience on its own but becomes all the more powerful when parents and teachers use game play as a springboard for conversations about media literacy and citizenship in the 21st Century.” Game gives kids a chance to create an online character.

Student Projects

Grades:

K-12

“Digital Storytelling is a great media literacy vehicle.”

Grades:

K-12

This series shares some interesting projects designed to “help users become fully engaged media consumers and producers."

Grades:

6-12

Different ideas of how students can enhance their media literacy skills through projects or lesson plans.

Grades:

K-12

“In the same way we teach traditional writing as a way of developing reading comprehension, by incorporating movie production, students became much more advanced in talking about the things that go into making a movie like costumes, makeup and special effects,” Needleman said. “It’s a real hands-on way of teaching media literacy because they are becoming much more critical thinkers about media, which is where they’re getting their information. There’s nothing in No Child Left Behind about media literacy, but it is something that is critical for students in today’s world.”

Educator Training

CE Credit:

Unknown

“Getting Started: Strategies for Introducing Media Literacy in your School or District” (More materials available in the Consortium’s store.

CE Credit:

Unknown

“Along with its handouts, Literacy for the 21st Century is an invaluable reference for teachers, media librarians, curriculum developers, researchers and anyone who wants to understand what media literacy is all about and/or explain it to others. As a resource for workshops, graduate seminars or faculty in-service programs, it provides an unparalleled overview of the field and a common language and vocabulary for building a media literacy program in a school or district.”

Helpful Resources & Tips

Grades:

K-12

“What is Media Literacy? A Definition … and More.” Includes up to date news and announcements.

Grades:

K-12

“This is the first in a series of articles about media literacy and how to teach your children to look and think critically about the media they view.” Although the website is designed primarily for parents, the materials here could also be used by a teacher in a classroom.

Grades:

K-12

“You can use these simple paper cards to introduce a structured approach that helps students learn to critically analyze any media text --- web sites, books, advertising, news, TV shows, movies, video games, magazines and music.”

“Media Literacy is a 21st century approach to education. It provides a framework to access, analyze, evaluate, create and participate with messages in a variety of forms — from print to video to the Internet. Media Literacy builds an understanding of the role of media in society as well as essential skills of inquiry and self-expression necessary for citizens of a democracy.” Includes many videos.

Grades:

K-12

27 Media Literacy Activities available for download.

Grades:

K-12

Adult instructional material dealing with Media Literacy.

Sources for Media Literacy instruction in schools.

Grades:

K-12

The Utah Education Network has links to numerous resources to become more media literate as well as teacher resources for teaching media literacy.